Category Archives: ESL Grammar

How to lead ESL Students to Discover their Grammar Mistakes on Writing Assignments

tutoring-writing

One-on-one conferencing

(This posting includes a handout which you are welcome to use with your students.)

Example of telling, not leading a students: “I see that you have a mistake in this sentence in your essay.  Instead of writing, ‘He was gave a reward,’ you should write, ‘He was given a reward.'”

All over the world and on almost every campus, there is a need for well-qualified teachers/tutors who understand grammar terms and who can “lead” ESL students to discover and correct their own mistakes, and by so doing, become better at self-editing.  Unfortunately, many teachers/tutors merely tell students what their mistakes are and how to correct them.  This approach has been proven to be ineffective at making students aware of their mistakes and at helping them become independent. The purpose of this posting is to give a brief introduction to an innovative and at the same time straight-forward techniques which teachers/tutors can use when conferencing individually with students about their writing assignments.

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Inductive Grammar: Why are there commas in these sentences? Here are some clues. What’s the rule?

jigsaw

Grammar can be fun, like a puzzle.

(This posting includes a handout which you are welcome to use with your students.)

During a teacher-training course that I was teaching for American college students who wanted to teach ESL, we were discussing where to put commas.  Several of the students said that they decide according to their breath.  As they are re-reading something that they had written, if they stop to take a breath, that’s where they put a comma.  Wow!

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Engaging grammar group activities (even for hesitant students)

group-work

Engaging group work

(This posting includes a handout which you are welcome to use with your students.)

Group work in a grammar class can be a powerful learning tool if it is carefully structured.  The format for the activities that I’ll present here has been effectively used with students from lower level to advanced. And the structure of these activities makes it easy for even the most passive students to be active; in fact, many times, the normally quiet students seem to shine while doing these.  Another positive aspect of these is that they are non-threatening for students to engage in.

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Grammar class: Confusion about when to use “where” vs “which”

Questions

(This posting includes a handout which you are welcome to use with your students.)

A tutor recently told me about her student who was confused by “where” and “which.”  She was wondering how I would approach this student’s question.   He had two sentences:

Shanghai is a city which has a population of eight million people.
Shanghai is a city where eight million people live.

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